sparklehime:

sparklehime:

look at this card

i really don’t want a popular post please i just wanted you guys to LOOK at the card

T A G S:  equality  

himym-life-lessons:

The Perfect Burger

T A G S:  HIMYM  

yrdeadbeatfriend:

sixpenceee:

canoeing in a crystal clear lake 

coolest but scariest fucking thing
T A G S:  wanderlst  

nuclearcarrots:

Download free fucking books!

getinthehandbasket:

nachosauruz:

A fuckload of classic literature:

  1. 1984 by George Orwell
  2. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  3. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
  4. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  5. Aesop’s Fables by Aesop
  6. Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë
  7. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll
  8. Andersen’s Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen
  9. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
  10. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  11. Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
  12. Beyond Good and Evil by Friedrich Nietzsche
  13. Bleak House by Charles Dickens
  14. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  15. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  16. Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
  17. Dracula by Bram Stoker
  18. Dubliners by James Joyce
  19. Emma by Jane Austen
  20. Erewhon by Samuel Butler
  21. For the Term of His Natural Life by Marcus Clarke
  22. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  23. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  24. Grimms Fairy Tales by the brothers Grimm
  25. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift
  26. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  27. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  28. Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
  29. Lady Chatterly’s Lover by D. H. Lawrence
  30. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
  31. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  32. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
  33. Middlemarch by George Eliot
  34. Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  35. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
  36. Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard by Joseph Conrad
  37. Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  38. Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham
  39. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
  40. Paradise Lost by John Milton
  41. Persuasion by Jane Austen
  42. Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter
  43. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  44. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
  45. Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
  46. Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence
  47. Swanns Way by Marcel Proust
  48. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  49. Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  50. Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
  51. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  52. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
  53. The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  54. The Great Gatsby
  55. The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
  56. The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  57. The Iliad by Homer
  58. The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells
  59. The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
  60. The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
  61. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
  62. The Odyssey by Homer
  63. The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle
  64. The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
  65. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  66. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James
  67. The Prince by Nicolo Machiavelli
  68. The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy
  69. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
  70. The Tales of Mother Goose by Charles Perrault
  71. The Thirty Nine Steps by John Buchan
  72. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Duma
  73. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
  74. The Trial by Franz Kafka
  75. The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
  76. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
  77. Ulysses by James Joyce
  78. Utopia by Sir Thomas More
  79. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
  80. Within A Budding Grove by Marcel Proust
  81. Women In Love by D. H. Lawrence
  82. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

Click on the motherfucking Hypelinks bitches.

Annnnd there goes all my free space on my Nook. Goodbye hard drive, HELLO CLASSICS!

T A G S:  ref    free books!  

The Breeze - LIGHT by Michael Grant Official US Book Trailer (x)

Jul 22  via  ©   64 notes
T A G S:  Light    Gone series    Michael Grant    the Breeeze    that last gif  

edwardspoonhands:

The whole SciShow office is so freaking stoked about this it’s adorable. To be clear, I also have not been this excited about a movie (that wasn’t based on my brother’s book) since Deathly Hallows.

Jul 22  via  ©   2781 notes

theblackrabbitofwonderland:

My biggest wish for Light is that Dekka will activate her power and starts belting out “Defying Gravity” with everyone in the FAYZ dancing and singing back up

Jul 22  via  ©   83 notes
T A G S:  other    FAYZ    Dekka    Gone series    Micheal Grant  

tuggywuggy:

My Leather Bound Books

Jul 22  via  ©   2848 notes
T A G S:  book porn  

gifss-heaveen:

Daily new gifs !

Jul 22  via  ©   3294 notes
T A G S:  people    how the crap    martial arts  

emberkeelty:

aporeticelenchus:

heidi8:

sonneillonv:

dressthesavage:

narwhalsareunderwaterunicorns:

anglofile:

spicyshimmy:

how is it possible to love fictional characters this much and also have people always been this way?

like, did queen elizabeth lie in bed late sometimes thinking ‘VERILY I CANNOT EVEN FOR MERCUTIO HATH SLAIN ME WITH FEELS’ 

was caesar like ‘ET TU ODYSSEUS’ 

sometimes i wonder

image

oh my GOD

the answer is yes they did. there’s a lot of research about the highly emotional reactions to the first novels widely available in print. 

here’s a thing; the printing press was invented in 1450 and whilst it was revolutionary it wasn’t very good. but then it got better over time and by the 16th century there were publications, novels, scientific journals, folios, pamphlets and newspapers all over Europe. at first most were educational or theological, or reprints of classical works.

however, novels gained in popularity, as basically what most people wanted was to read for pleasure. they became salacious, extremely dramatic, with tragic heroines and doomed love and flawed heroes (see classical literature, only more extreme.) books in the form of letters were common. sensationalism was par the course and apparently used to teach moral lessons. there was also a lot of erotica floating around. 

but here’s the thing: due to the greater availability of literature and the rise of comfy furniture (i shit you not this is an actual historical fact, the 16th and 17th century was when beds and chairs got comfy) people started reading novels for pleasure, women especially. as these novels were highly emotional, they too became…highly emotional. there are loads of contemporary reports of young women especially fainting, having hysterics, or crying fits lasting for days due to the death of a character or their otp’s doomed love. they became insensible over books and characters, and were very vocal about it. men weren’t immune-there’s a long letter a middle-aged man wrote to the author of his favourite work basically saying that the novel is too sad, he can’t handle all his feels, if they don’t get together he won’t be able to go on, and his heart is already broken at the heroine’s tragic state (IIRC ehh). 

conservatives at the time were seriously worried about the effects of literature on people’s mental health, and thought it damaging to both morals and society. so basically yes it is exactly like what happens on tumblr when we cry over attractive British men, only my historical theory (get me) is that their emotions were even more intense, as they hadn’t had a life of sensationalist media to numb the pain for them beforehand in the same way we do, nor did they have the giant group therapy session that is tumblr. 

(don’t even get me started on the classical/early medieval dudes and their boners for the Iliad i will be here all week. suffice to say, the members of the Byzantine court used Homeric puns instead of talking normally to each other if someone who hand’t studied the classics was in the room. they had dickish fandom in-jokes. boom.) 

I needed to know this.

See, we’re all just the current steps in a time-honored tradition! (And this post is good to read along with Affectingly’s post this week about old-school-fandom-and-history-and-stuff.

Ancient Iliad fandom is intense

Alexander the Great and and his boyfriend totally RPed Achilles and Patroclus. Alexander shipped that hard. (It’s possible that this story is apocryphal, but that would just mean that ancient historians were writing RPS about Alexander and Hephaestion RPing Iliad slash and honestly that’s just as good).

And then there’s this gem from Plato:

"Very different was the reward of the true love of Achilles towards his lover Patroclus - his lover and not his love (the notion that Patroclus was the beloved one is a foolish error into which Aeschylus has fallen, for Achilles was surely the fairer of the two, fairer also than all the other heroes; and, as Homer informs us, he was still beardless, and younger far)” - Symposium

That’s right: 4th Century BCE arguments about who topped. Nihil novi sub sole my friends.

More on this glorious subject from people who know way more than I do

T A G S:  yes    this makes me happy    books    history    reading  

luna3141:

doctor who meme: two quotes [1/2]
the doctor’s wife, 6x04.

"I wanted to see the universe, so I stole a Time Lord and ran away." I can’t get over that line.

Jul 22  via  ©   166 notes
T A G S:  quote  

Kindness. I think we tend to overlook this one the most or we tend to do too much…

Jul 22  via  ©   666 notes
T A G S:  women    Anna Akana  

youknowyoureafayzianwhen:

submitted by army-of-bus-sized-bugs

Jul 22  via  ©   35 notes

sixpenceee:

Sir Nicholas Winton is a humanitarian who organized a rescue operation that saved the lives of 669 Jewish Czechoslovakia children from Nazi death camps, and brought them to the safety of Great Britain between the years 1938-1939.

After the war, his efforts remained unknown. But in 1988, Winton’s wife Grete found the scrapbook from 1939 with the complete list of children’s names and photos. Sir Nicholas Winton is sitting in an audience of Jewish Czechoslovakian people who he saved 50 years before.

WATCH FULL VIDEO HERE

T A G S:  people